Mick Slattery of SureFire Surfboards – Technical surf and sup design and construction discussion.

Mick Slattery of SureFire Surfboards – Technical surf and sup design and construction discussion.

Mick Slattery is the owner and shaper/designer for SureFire Surfboards out of Australia.  He comes on the podcast to have a technical discussion on design and construction.  Mick is leading the charge in design for performance surfing in standup.  Check out his designs at SureFire Surfboards, and follow him on socials at Instagram and Facebook.

 

Hans Wagner, Head of ESSC Contest Series, On the Podcast

Hans Wagner, Head of ESSC Contest Series, On the Podcast

It’s been a couple years in the making, but this week, ahead of the best forecast I’ve seen on the East Coast of Florida, Hans Wagner and I hop on the podcast to discuss the ESSC Contest Series and the ON call for next weekend.  Hans is a passionate paddle surfer and like me came into paddle surfing as a lifelong surfer.  The surfer background permeates his paddling philosophy and our discussion starts off with the swell forecast and details on the event but then turns into board design, the benefits of being a paddle surfer, and what board to ride for what conditions.

Enjoy and I hope we see you at the contest on March 10th!

 

Mo Freitas Podcast 2018

Mo Freitas Podcast 2018

If you’re on this site, you know Mo.  He’s the current ISA champ, the APP World Tour overall champ and I think he’s the most polished paddle surfer in the game.

Mo comes back on the show to discuss his last year of competition, the big news about his board sponsor change and we get technical on training and surfing.  We break down some turns and techniques in the second half of the show and discuss creativity near the end.  Enjoy!

Listen on iTunes, Stitcher

Some links from the show…

We break down the turn at 1:15 in this video…

Trigger Point Foam Rollers  – Mo and Erik both use these rollers every day, no sponsorships here, just love the product.

Lead in photo credit – https://www.instagram.com/tdubz808

 

 

Paddlewoo Returns!

Paddlewoo Returns!

You can subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher or iTunes.

I am stoked to announce that the Paddlewoo Podcast has returned!  And there’s going to be some changes coming…  In this episode I’m joined by Chase Kosterlitz – we’re catching up on my last trip to Costa Rica and we discuss Blue Zone, which Chase is now leading, what he’s learned coaching, the J stroke, and the future of the Paddlewoo podcast.

We’ll be releasing a few episodes every month.  I will be continuing to explore surfing, learning and with the addition of board design and construction, and Chase will focus on racing and the lifestyle of SUP.

For more info on Blue Zone Sup check out our website here, and to check out the Barra shape from Portal Surf Designs click here.

Stay tuned for a great year!

Thoughts on Race to the Bottom, Volume and where the industry missed

Thoughts on Race to the Bottom, Volume and where the industry missed

Some updated thoughts on volume, how best to train for stability, and board trends in the industry.

There is a definite relationship between surfing performance and lower v/w ratios.  If you look at any of the top pros they are riding negative ratios, less float than weight.  The majority of good surfers are riding at or below a 1.3 ratio.  So a 150lbs surfer would at or under 88L or 180lbs – 107L.

I hold firm to the belief that if your goal is to be able to surf at a high level on a SUP you should have a target of getting into the 1.3 or lower range.  My experience in coaching the last few years has changed my mind on the correct path to get there for a majority of paddle surfers.  (paddle surfers without an extensive surfing background)

To explain, I need to take a step back.  I came into paddle surfing with a long history of surfing shortboards.  So when I decided to start paddle surfing I wasn’t concerned with wave knowledge, catching waves, or the surfing component.  In evaluating the best paddle surfers it was obvious that small boards were a must, and that small was largely a reflection of volume.  The surfing would take care of itself once I could stand on a board I could surf.  This resonates with anyone coming into standup from the surf world.

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It wasn’t until I started to understand how the learning process works with my study of learning and coaching that I discovered the error in pushing volume and learning to surf at the same time.  The mind can only process a few new skills at once, and when you push your limits in one area, other skills that have yet to be internalized revert to old habits/patterns.

I’ll give you an example –  Someone pushing their volume limits riding a 100L board, who is comfortable in waist high surf, will probably be ok (stable) surfing the 100L board in waist high surf, but when you increase the stress of the situation by introducing larger waves, that the surfer isn’t comfortable surfing, focus will shift to the waves and positioning, and balance will become an issue.

I call that increase in stress is called a flow multiplier, and while flow multipliers are great fun once you’ve hit a certain level, they aren’t great at the beginning of the learning process, in fact they retard it.

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What I’ve done with my private clients this year is to separate training for volume/stability and surfing skills.  I recommend having at least 2 boards, the comfortable now board (higher volume), and the future stretch board (lower volume).  Then, when the waves are good and focus should be spent on surfing, ride the larger board.  And when focused on training stability, either in lower quality surf or flat water, practice paddling the smaller board.  As you move towards lower volumes the difference in volume will shrink.

The race to the bottom is important, and should be a priority in your training, but should be separated from surfing (at times)  and this will increase the learning curve both for surfing and stability.

Ok, so volume is important, but what are the limits?

That depends on your ability, tolerance to pain, endurance and goals.  The limits for Mo or Gio would be at about a .9 v/w ratio – they are massively talented, 100% focused on performance and the last 1% matters (photos, videos, contests…), have incredible endurance (paddling super small boards is exponentially more work/cardio output) and their goal is to surf their best.

Those might not be your goals, and they aren’t mine anymore.  You get some beautiful moments riding incredibly small boards but at the cost of more work and less waves.  The trick is finding the intersection between surfing performance (lower volume) and wave count/fun (higher volume).  And then, once we’ve found the inflection point dial up or down volume as the situation calls it.

 

Let’s look at what the industry has done regarding volume in performance paddle surfing.

If we go back 3 years and follow the trends of boards you’ll see most of the SUP surfing shapes starting to go full-on shortboard style.  Lots of rocker, lower volumes, excessive pumping and paddling to get speed, which completely misses the ease of glide and smoothness of longboard/mid-length surfing and folks got frustrated.

The pendulum was bound to swing back, it did, and in the last year we’ve seen the increase of longboard style boards.  9 and 10 foot boards at 27-29 inches wide and still in the lower volume range, aimed at good surfers.  But these shapes completely miss the radical/explosive shortboarding aspect of paddle surfing.  Fun to paddle with a high wave count, but forget about smashing a lip.

If you believe, as I do, that paddle surfing is the perfect blend of the ease of speed and glide of longboarding/mid-length boards and the radical explosiveness of shortboarding then there isn’t anyone who I believed has yet solved the issue.  And it proved a large enough challenge to get me interested.

And if I extrapolate farther, I wish those were the core components of competitive paddle surfing. I was talking to Dave Kalama on an early paddlewoo podcast and he said he didn’t agree with the current path of standup as it would be seen as bad shortboarding, and he suggested a board length minimum.  I don’t agree on regulating board size, but do think changing the criteria would be good for the sport.  Embracing the style elements possible on surfing a larger board would broaden the audience and eventually the market for standup surfing.